Predator sightings over the last fortnight

Newington Male heads towards his favourite warthog burrow in the early morning - Matt Nolden

Newington Male heads towards his favourite warthog burrow in the early morning - Matt Nolden

Predator sightings have been plentiful over the past two weeks!

Leopard sightings:

The following leopards were seen over the last two weeks:

Gowrie Male

Gowrie Male looking well fed - Matt Nolden

Gowrie Male looking well fed - Matt Nolden

The Bateleur that pointed us in the direction of the Gowrie Male's Impala Kill - Matt Nolden

The Bateleur that pointed us in the direction of the Gowrie Male's impala kill - Matt Nolden

Bicycle Crossing Male

Princess Alice Pans Male

West Street Male

West Street Male - Matt Nolden

West Street Male - Matt Nolden

Newington Male

Newington Male at West Street early morning - Matt Nolden

Newington Male at West Street early morning - Matt Nolden

Newington Male once again hunting around the Airstrip - Matt Nolden

The Newington Male, once again hunting around the airstrip - Matt Nolden

Airstrip Male

Airstrip Male and Emsagweni Female Mating - Matt Nolden

Airstrip Male and Emsagweni Female, mating - Matt Nolden

Charleston Male

Charleston Male, spotted for the first time in months - Matt Nolden

Charleston Male, spotted for the first time in months - Brett Ross

Son of the Dudley female 2009

Kikilezi Female

Tamboti Female

Ostrich Koppies Female

Emsagweni female The Emsagweni Female was seen mating with Airstrip Male. The two leopards killed a steenbok, and consumed it while mating intermittently.

Matshipiri Female and her daughter (1 year and 10 months) on impala kill

Daughter of the Matshipiri female. The two leopards were found with a male impala kill - Matt Nolden

Daughter of the Matshipiri female. She and her mother were found with a male impala kill - Brett Ross

Two unidentified leopards

Male Leopard known as the Selati Male. Photo taken by guest while on safari at Malamala private Game Reserve - guest at MalaMala

Male Leopard known as the Selati Male. Photo taken by a guest at MalaMala Game Reserve

Could this be the daughter of the Jakkalsdraai female She should be two years and 10 months old - Matt Nolden

Could this be the daughter of the Jakkalsdraai female, who would be two years and 10 months old? - Matt Nolden

There was on old female found near split rock, as well as a young female who was found following the scent of the Bicycle Crossing male around Charleston North. A no ID male was seen on the Western Bank of the Sand River. This may be a leopard known as the Selati Male.

Hyena attack on Cape Hunting Dogs

Alpha Male of the pack injured by either the hyena clan who stole a kill or injured by the horns of the male impala which they killed - Matt Nolden

The Alpha male of the pack was injured either by the hyena clan who stole a kill, or by the horns of the male impala which the pack killed - Matt Nolden

Wild dogs on a mating mission - Matt Nolden

Wild dogs on a mating mission - Matt Nolden

Heading into mid winter, the dogs are looking for a place to den. We have caught them mating twice now. One morning, five hyenas running along the road led us to a pack of nine Wild Dogs that had killed a young male impala. One of the dogs suffered a nasty bite from a hyena when the hyenas chased the dogs off the remains of the kill. The image shows the open wound on the left side if his neck.

Lions:

Three Manyelthi Males looking to cross the Sand River - Matt Nolden

Three Manyelthi Males looking to cross the Sand River - Matt Nolden

The last two weeks was loaded with lion and buffalo interaction. On at least three of these occasions, we had two prides of lions hunting different herds of buffalo at the same time. It’s been Malamala magic, with action-packed game drives leaving rangers and guests on an adrenalin high.

The Fourways pride, the Eyrefield pride and the Styx pride have been trying to kill buffalo from different herds simultaneously.

Styx pride

Members of the Styx pride devour a buffalo calf - Matt Nolden

Members of the Styx pride devour a buffalo calf - Matt Nolden

Rangers and guests saw the pride chasing buffalo on several occasions. One evening, the lions eventually grabbed hold of a young calf after trying many times to bring down the large dagga boys. We watched in awe from the river bed as the lionesses and sub-adults chased the buffalo along the ridge of the river bank.

Fourways Pride

Fourways Pride - Matt Nolden

Fourways Pride - Matt Nolden

Fourways pride with a sixth member, a young male. Third lioness is absent in this photograph. The Pride spent the night and two folllowing days trailing a herd of buffalo - Matt Nolden

Fourways pride with a sixth member, a young male. Third lioness is absent in this photograph. The Pride spent the night and two following days trailing a herd of buffalo - Matt Nolden

The pride has been joined by another male of similar age to the eldest sub adult male. The six lions are a force to be reckoned with.

Eyrefield Pride

Eyrefield Lioness looking intently towards a herd of buffalo. Rangers and guests watched the pride hunting buffalo on at least five occasions during the last two weeks - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield lioness looking intently towards a herd of buffalo. Rangers and guests watched the pride hunt buffalo at least five times during the last two weeks - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield pride - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield pride - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield Pride Hunting Buffalo - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield Pride Hunting Buffalo - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield Pride Kill Buffalo at the Kapen River

Eyrefield Pride Kill Buffalo at the Kapen River - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield Pride dig in! - Matt Nolden

Eyrefield Pride dig in! - Matt Nolden

The pride has been hunting buffalo on a regular basis. One ranger saw the pride hunting four times in one week. They made a spectacular kill on Sunday morning – watch this space for more on this hunt…

Charleston pride

The Charleston Pride - the first sighting this year - Matt Nolden

The Charleston Pride - the first sighting this year - Brett Meadows

This pride was seen for the first time in months.

Matt Nolden

Ranger – MalaMala Game Reserve

PLEASE NOTE: Animals on MalaMala are named after their territories. This means that (a) only the predators have been given names and (b) we only know the animals according to the names we have given them, as they are based on the territories within MalaMala’s boundaries.

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